Lisa Rose

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    2 comments  ·  Character Animator » User experience/interface  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →

    @Lisa Rose, you’ll get no argument on the diversity front and keep an eye on the blog – https://theblog.adobe.com/creative-cloud/character-animator/ – as we add new puppets. You also can find some less age specific examples in our earlier shared puppets here: https://character.adobelanding.com/puppets/

    In regard to the drawing styles, would you be kind enough to post a couple examples of the types of artwork that indicate the competency in figure drawing you’re describing? While we always strive to make people aware of how many styles can be brought into the app, it would help to have the particular perspective to discuss. Thanks!

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    Lisa Rose commented  · 

    PS ...One more thing in response to your request. I remember my teachers and my dad telling me about dead giveaways the the person was not that proficient in drawing the figure: I see that now more clearly and immediately than ever before and I now look for these things when I jury a show or evaluate a portfolio et al:

    - Repeatedly hiding hands and feet
    - Little differentiation in the character, personality, characteristics of a figure (less skilled artists will tend to draw figures that look like themselves - variations in age, gender, race, etc. tend to be absent; competent artists truly can step out of themselves and portray characters young, old, multi-racial - and not just via color - etc.)

    I hope that helps to give you an idea of how competency actually is evaluated by those of us who have been at this for long enough to have gone from drawing on an animation disk and shooting animation onto 35mm sprocketed film to the range of Adobe tools which mimic and expand upon these historic tools.

    Some 30 years ago I stood in a small room in Mountain View while a couple of people showed me something that turned pixels into paths. They asked me what I thought and if I had any suggestions for product names. That product is today Adobe Illustrator. And of Adobe AfterEffects, I was brought on by Apple in 1986 to experiment with some animation software written by Mark Cantor. Today, that software is in fact AE. And lastly, I actually produced and created the very first animated film created ENTIRELY on an Apple Macintosh - I drew every 'frame' using a mouse and fried the primitive version of a hard drive in that old Mac Apple gave me to play with for a year. I did this little film for Tandem Computers (history).

    History is useful - and I hope I've helped you in moving forward in developing CH.

    Best,
    Lisa Rose

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    Lisa Rose commented  · 

    Competency in figure drawing (critical in animation still today) are immediately evident in an artist's representation of hands and feet (in different gestures), accuracy in differentiating character and personality, and all of this multiplied by the challenge of depiction in 3, 4, and more point perspective.

    For animation, these skills are absolutely critical. If you cannot depict a hand competently, you won't be able to rig it well. This is why at CalArts even today, animation students still draw the human figure using classical techniques going back more than 100 years and all of us continue to draw from the figure regularly just like athletes workout to maintain their skill level.

    I would suggest for contemporary examples of competency in figure drawing - re people alive today, check out Karl Gnass of the Screen Cartoonist Guild. He runs the regular drawing sessions and classes there and that's where animators in Hollywood go to maintain their competency.

    Animators like Richard Williams (no longer on the planet), my own teacher - Corny Cole and Gerard Baldwin, Moe Golub, and my own dad as well (David Rose - all these old masters are gone now... another reason I double down on this when I teach) are animators whose style and fluency in animation and strong character design reflected a basic mastery in the classical skills of drawing the figure. Another animator working today whose competency in drawing the figure is a great example is Mark Kirkland (Simpsons - if you look at his figure drawings and then look at his work on the Simpsons, you will see how his competency level in this fundamental skill supports the Simpsons work he does).

    I hope that helps.

    Lisa Rose
    M.F.A., Animation
    Professor of Art

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