T. Williams

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  1. 4 votes

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    3 comments  ·  Premiere Pro » Closed Captions  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    T. Williams commented  · 

    Hi Dacia,

    Ah! You are indeed correct. I had not thought to try that. I was highlighting the word in the caption text panel on the left, not via the text in the program monitor.

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  2. 1 vote

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    2 comments  ·  Premiere Pro » Closed Captions  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    T. Williams commented  · 

    Hi Jason. Looks like you're partially right. I can indeed import TTML files, but they do not import properly. All subtitle instances end up with top-left positioning.

    Additionally, I see no way to _export_ a subtitle file in a manner that preserves positioning. Only SRT or raw text methods are offered, and neither of those methods provide positioning.

    In summary, I need to be able to do a round trip. I need to be able to import a timed text file and then re-export that file (or vice versa) without losing the positioning info.

    I'd like to attach an example TTML file with this message, but my attempts to do so here seem to be unsuccessful.

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  3. 75 votes

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    73 comments  ·  Premiere Pro » Closed Captions  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    T. Williams commented  · 

    Please DO NOT remove this restriction altogether, however, an override would be useful.

    My team has the opposite problem -- We need the captions to default to the Action Safe margin, rather than the Title Safe margin.

    Both problems could probably be solved with an option box that presents three options: Title Safe, Action Safe, or None.

  4. 34 votes

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    6 comments  ·  Premiere Pro » Closed Captions  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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  5. 86 votes

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    78 comments  ·  Premiere Pro » Closed Captions  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →

    This is not a bug, it’s as designed. We specifically limit the visibility to one track at a time to avoid accidentally burning in multiple tracks. Also, when exporting to a format that only supports one captions stream like SRT or STL, we need to know which is the active track in order to export the correct track.

    But I understand why you might need two tracks visible at the same time.

    Multiple speakers:
    If we could automatically identify speakers and designate a style associated with them, would that help? For example speaker 1 is blue and on the left, speaker 2 is yellow and on the right?

    Multiple languages:
    Do you ever need to burn in both at the same time or is it just a matter of being able to see both to aid in translation and alignment?

    Thanks for the feedback, we really are listening :)

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    T. Williams commented  · 

    Our company does anime subtitling and our workflow is stuck on Final Cut 7. Adobe's design choice to prohibit multiple subtitle tracks means that we're stuck on FCP7 that much longer.

    Our use-case is that we not only need to subtitle spoken dialogue, but also any incidental on-screen kanji text pertinent to the story (such as a classroom chalkboard, a road sign, a book cover, etc). Many of our clients' shows are heavy on such. We place spoken dialogue at the bottom of the screen, and the subtitle for the on-screen text appears at the top of the screen simultaneously.

    On a related note, it would also be a MASSIVE boon if Adobe could provide a subtitle export format that includes a subtitle's position. SRT does not. This is extra important to us because (in addition to the above example) our clients also require us to reposition subtitles in close-up shots so that the text doesn't obscure the face or lips of the character speaking. I would suggest implementing TTML export since that is a well adopted W3C standard by now (Premiere 2020 even used something close to that within the .prproj files). And the position data doesn't need to be pixel perfect, just the basic nine-square positions is good enough.

    In the meantime, our entire company remains stuck on a 12-yr old NLE because it's the only thing we've found that can do overlapping subtitles and export to a format that preserves positioning.

  6. 3 votes

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    2 comments  ·  Premiere Pro » Closed Captions  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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