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James Clark

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  1. 2 votes

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    0 comments  ·  Premiere Pro » Editing  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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  2. 2 votes

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    2 comments  ·  Premiere Pro » Editing  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    James Clark commented  · 

    It'd be better to have a feature that does it as you requested, but until then, there's a few different things you can do. Which approach depends on what you want to achieve. I'll list 3 methods.

    Important in choosing which workaround is what was meant by the 'audio doesn't get attached to the nest sequence'. All the workarounds I can offer do create a multicamera source sequence which has whichever audio you chose as part of it, but I think maybe what you meant was, when you live-switch the multicamera clips you're making by using your nesting technique, it's only switching the video and not the audio. In that case, only method 1 will work for you.

    METHOD 1: If you want a multicamera source sequence (MSS) where you can live switch both the video and audio, usually you would need to make the MSS using clips in the bin and choose 'switch audio' in the 'sequence settings' section of the MSS dialogue box. Because in your case, you're making your MSSs by nesting and then clicking 'enable multicamera' it's bypassing the dialogue box and making the default variety of multicamera source sequence where the sequence settings are set to 'camera 1'. To get around this, you can create essentially an empty shell MSS with the correct switch audio settings in to which you're going to paste you're manually synced material. Select any two clips in your project, doesn't matter if they are synchronous with each other, right-click and select 'create multicamera source sequence', at the MSS creation dialogue box, set the sequence settings to 'switch audio'. Now take your newly created MSS in the project window and right click it and select 'open in timeline'. Select everything in this timeline and delete it, you don't want that stuff, it was just there so you create an MSS with the right settings, now go back to your sync timeline and select everything inside it (or just the parts of it you want in a single MSS), now press cmd/ctrl + c to copy this material, go back to your empty MSS and press cmd/ctrl V to paste. Now when you use this MSS, it will contain the material you wanted it to contain and you can also live switch video and audio synchronously.

    METHOD 2: Maybe you didn't mean you wanted the ability to live switch audio and video at the same time (which is less common for multicamera editing) and were just having trouble creating an MSS with the audio you wanted. Try this then.

    If you want the ability to make multiple different MSSs from different sections of your sync timeline (as opposed to one big one with everything from your sync timeline), follow these steps:

    In your sync timeline, set in and out points over the parts you want to use to create an MSS, and also select all the video and audio tracks that you would like to be included (in case you don't necessarily want all of them). In the top-bar menu (or with a keyboard shortcut if you have one mapped), select 'make subsequence', this will automatically create a new sequence in the active bin you have open in the project window, which will be named after your sync sequence with '_sub01' as a suffix. At the moment, this is just a normal sequence, not an MSS. Splice this clip into your edit timeline, making sure you have the toggle for sequence insertion set to insert sequences as nests, not clips. The first time you do this, because it's just a normal sequence, you won't get the multi-angle view in the source monitor, don't worry, you'll only have to deal with that once. Right-click on the clip you just inserted in to your edit timeline and enable multicamera. Now, immediately, hit the match-frame key. When you do this the icon for the source sequence you created before will turn in to the icon for an MSS. Now when you use that clip it will behave just like a regular MSS, you'll have the multiple angle grid in the source monitor, and you can open-in-timeline to make changes to it later if you see fit. This will be the default variety of MSS with the 'camera 1' sequence settings, which is usually fine in most circumstances.

    METHOD 3: The third and final option is almost exactly the same as the second one, but has a few less steps. Use this method if you know that you want everything in your manual sync timeline to become one MSS, and don't intend to make several. Take your sync timeline, and duplicate it (for safety's sake in case you ever want to return to your sync timeline). Now insert your duplicated timeline in to your edit timeline (with the toggle for sequence insertion set to insert as nests, not clips). Then follow the rest of the steps from METHOD 2 with this timeline.

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  3. 3 votes

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    0 comments  ·  Premiere Pro » Preference & Settings  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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  4. 4 votes

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    1 comment  ·  Premiere Pro » Editing  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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  5. 16 votes

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    4 comments  ·  Premiere Pro » Editing  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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  6. 31 votes

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    10 comments  ·  Premiere Pro » Editing  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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  7. 18 votes

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    4 comments  ·  Premiere Pro » Editing  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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  8. 9 votes

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    1 comment  ·  Premiere Pro » Audio  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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  9. 6 votes

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    1 comment  ·  Premiere Pro » Editing  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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  10. 2 votes

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    1 comment  ·  Premiere Pro » Editing  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    James Clark commented  · 

    Hey man. I just posted a suggestion regarding sync locks as well, although mine was about a way to improve their current implementation. Are you requesting that they exist at all, or have I misunderstood?

    I ask because if you're just suggesting that Premiere have sync locks then I have good news for you. Premiere has sync locks already. If you look at the left side of the time line where you can see the track numbers written, you'll notice that to the right of the track number icon, and to the left of the eyeball icon there's an icon represented as two rectangles and a conjoining line shaped a bit like a backwards 'c'.

    Those are Premiere's sync locks, if you click on one of those for a given track, a diagonal line will appear through the icon indicating that sync will be disabled for that track allowing you to make cuts with rippling effects like insert or extract on other tracks safely without affecting the track for whom sync lock is disabled. You can also still make cuts to that track, if you've selected it as the active track, which is where it differs from simply 'locking' the track.

    My problem with the sync locks though, is that they affect synchronisation of edits you make only uni-directionally; they prevent actions you do to OTHER tracks affecting specific ones you've selected, but they don't prevent actions you perform on the track itself from affecting others. Imagine you're cutting a music video and wisely turn off sync lock for the music track so you can make whatever rippling cuts to the video you like without affecting the music. Everything's going great and just like you wanted, except now imagine you want to make a change to the music track without affecting all the other tracks. You'd think since you'd already disabled sync locks on that track, that it would mean nothing on that track is synchronised with other tracks, but in fact if you were to make an insert edit on the music track, that insert would place a gap of the same length on all the OTHER tracks besides the music as well with the way sync locks currently work. I use music video as an example because that's something I know you're particularly familiar with but actually it's not a situation where my gripe with sync locks matters much because you'd rarely if ever be making changes to the music track that have rippling effects, you'd likely only be altering things like volume. However in other situations like documentary, with a lot of overlay and interview these uni-drectional rather than bi-directional sync locks are a pain in the bum. Other platforms will treat sync locks bi-directionally which makes more sense.

    I posted my suggestion here. https://adobe-video.uservoice.com/forums/911233-premiere-pro/suggestions/39229129-modify-behaviour-of-sync-locks-so-that-they-preven

    Hopefully for you though, your issue is solved because in fact there ARE sync locks. Hope that makes you happy.

  11. 1 vote

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    0 comments  ·  Premiere Pro » Editing  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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  12. 4 votes

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    1 comment  ·  Premiere Pro » Essential Graphics  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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  13. 15 votes

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    11 comments  ·  Premiere Pro » Editing  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    James Clark commented  · 

    AvatarAnonymous commented · Just Now · Delete

    I remember this feature in FCP7 and also that I found it generally to be a good feature. I also remember more than a couple of times where this behaviour happened and I really wished it hadn't and I had to go back and undo this change. You might do well to specify that when you say 'move' independently you're specifically referring to vertical movement in the timeline, that is, moving over tracks, not over time.

    I had not thought of this feature since FCP 7 until just now when I read your request for it so it's interesting in that I evidently didn't personally need it and didn't even miss it when it was gone as it's not done in Premiere or Avid either.

    I can't actually recall where it was that this feature was actually useful to me. I suppose it's a good way to tell visually which audio corresponds to which media because the video channel number that a video clip resides on will be the same number as whatever audio is on the audio track of that number, but for something like editing, such a rule would be so frequently misleading that I can't imagine relying on it much.

    If you could describe how you would use this feature to help you when you use Premiere (why you want it to do this), maybe you can get some more votes, or someone can advise how to work in a way that is at least almost the same as what you'd like.

  14. 36 votes

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    12 comments  ·  Premiere Pro » Editing  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    James Clark commented  · 

    I can see how this could be quite handy, and the fact that you have the gif of it in action in Audition really illustrates the concept because I wasn't sure what you meant when expressed in words.

    This would DEFINITELY need to something optional though. If this happened every time, by default I'd be furious. I slide segments on a timeline all the time when editing and at least some of the time that may well be audio clips.

    What I would like to see though is better management of transitions when one actively chooses to apply one. Presently it's impossible to do without having to switch to using the mouse, and while there are multiple transition types for both vision and audio, you can't simply apply a default and transition and then change it to whichever type you'd like, you have to use the drag and drop methodology and choose from the effects menu.

    This'd be great for doing an audio pass after editing is finished though.

  15. 125 votes

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    13 comments  ·  Premiere Pro » User experience/interface  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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