James Clark

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  1. 7 votes

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    1 comment  ·  Premiere Pro » Audio  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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  2. 8 votes

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    5 comments  ·  Premiere Pro » Editing  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    James Clark commented  · 

    Hey Andrew, I've discovered a function within Premiere that's a bit like what you're requesting. It's not the same and has it's irritating foibles, but I'm going to start using this until an insert gap feature is implemented.

    Turns out there's a couple of keyboard mappable commands called 'set all source video to gaps' and 'set all source audio to gap'. Load a clip in to the source monitor and press the key you've assigned to this command and you'll see that the icon for the source video tracks changes to a state of neither the typical blue for activated nor grey for deactivated, it instead becomes blue with a black box around it. It does what the name suggests, any thing you insert from the source monitor inserts as gap in to the timeline rather than as video (or audio if you it was the 'set all source audio to gaps' command that you pressed). You can set in and out points in the source for the duration of gap you'd like, or you can set no in points in the source and instead set them in the timeline and then perform an insert edit and voila you've inserted a gap. This gap satisfies your requirements in that you can set in and out points on the timeline if you want, it shifts everything down the timeline from the in point to the out point leaving a gap, and it doesn't affect sync lock disabled tracks. I don't know about the 5th condition, I think it probably doesn't satisfy that one.

    It has major drawbacks though:

    - You have to have something in the source monitor, if you've nothing loaded at the time, you can't set nothing to insert as a gap and thus would have to waste time loading any random clip for the sake of this feature which renders useless in such a circumstance.
    - You can only toggle the insert as gaps state ON, not off, with the keyboard. To go back to normal, insert and overwrite behaviour, you to either click the source track selectors with the mouse, or use other key commands such as 'toggle all source video/audio' or maybe a track assignment preset. This is by far the weirdest thing about it, why would you make something that only has an on function, but no off?
    - If you wanted a really long gap for some reason, and the source clip's entire duration is shorter than the length of your gap, this wouldn't work because that's as much material as can be loaded. (It's a bit like how Avid's insert filler, can only be a maxium of 32767 frames long)
    - Much like the toggle all source video tracks and toggle all source audio tracks commands that are useful, this command lacks global all tracks button. It's either audio or video per key you assign. This is pretty annoying if you don't want to waste 2 separate physical keys, or have too many cumbersome modifier combinations, and I personally just mapped the video one, ignoring audio. But that's problematic if your source audio tracks are switched on because in Premiere, even if a given target track is switched off, source clips will still be inserted on that track, if the source track is on and assigned to that target track. For me this means having to remember to press my hotkey for disabling all audio tracks, which just adds another step in the process making it less useful.

    but it's just about useful enough to be worth it for now I think.

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    James Clark commented  · 

    This is awesome. I was about to put up a feature request that works the same as Avid's load filler shortcut that loads filler in to the source monitor as though it were a clip and one could set in and out points to the desired length and then insert like a normal clip except instead of an adjustable timeline segment appearing, you just have gap of the appropriate length on the timeline.

    Your suggested method of working is even better than this because you know exactly how long you're going to want it to be by setting the in and out points precisely on the timeline. At present the best worst workaround I have in absence of this makes use of my heavily mapped keyboard.

    In case anyone wants to use my workaround in the interim (it's a lot less good than just having an insert filler shortcut) here's how I do it, I'll use the names of the commands rather than the keys because mine are custom but anyone can map them:

    1. Select target tracks that I would like to move with the keyboard shortcuts for different track toggles (I map 1 to 8 for video and shift 1 to 8 for audio)
    2. Clear any existing in and out points if you have them
    3. Set an in point, but no out point, this essentially sets the out point to the sequence end
    4. Press whatever key you have mapped to the command 'Select in to out', this will select all clips on the selected tracks just like if you'd lasso selected them
    5. Move those clips around either with your mouse or using the 'nudge clip selection' shortcuts, or hit the plus or minus key on the numeric keypad to enter a time value by which to nudge the selection.

    Though there are 5 steps listed an it's a bit convoluted I do find it's JUST convenient enough to be slightly better than the select tracks forward tool or zooming out and lassoing clips and deselecting the ones you don't want.

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  3. 54 votes

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    13 comments  ·  Premiere Pro » User experience/interface  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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  4. 30 votes

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    4 comments  ·  Premiere Pro » 3rd Party Software  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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  5. 4 votes

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  6. 34 votes

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    10 comments  ·  Premiere Pro » Editing  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    James Clark commented  · 

    It's weird that it doesn't, since the render and replace function presumably exists for effects heavy situations where you need playback optimised and those are exactly the scenarios you're most likely to use nests.

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  7. 20 votes

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    11 comments  ·  Premiere Pro » Editing  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    James Clark commented  · 

    Hey Trevor, are you referring to the 'toggle all source video tracks', 'toggle all source audio tracks', 'toggle all target video tracks', and 'toggle all target audio tracks' commands when you say there's already a 'deselect all'? Or am I missing out on something?

    If you are referring to those, that is indeed the best equivalent that currently exists in Premiere to a 'deselect all tracks' command and is what I use right now, but it's not the same thing as a deselect all tracks command. For one thing, it's separated in to four commands divided in to video and audio toggles, and also source and target. Additionally, they're toggles, meaning you have to know the current state of the toggle first in order to use any such command effectively.

    If you have say 5 target video tracks with some of them activated, but not all, and you want to deactivate all of them at once with the keyboard, you have to first toggle all target video tracks once, which will ACTIVATE, not deactivate, all of them at once, and then press it again to deactivate. This is only one extra keypress, but it gets messy especially if it looks like all tracks are selected but there's actually just one somewhere that you missed resulting in an unexpected outcome and temporary confusion. On top of the you have to do the same procedure over again for the audio. Also because they're separated in to 2 sets of controls for source and target, it's way less efficient than a system based around window focus (as with individual track activation).

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    James Clark commented  · 

    It goes hand in hand with the need to deselect all tracks, https://adobe-video.uservoice.com/forums/911233-premiere-pro/suggestions/35351707-deselect-all-tracks-shortcut

    In the original poster's description for this auto-patching feature request, they mention you can quickly have the source V1 patched to program V5 for example, but you can actually also switch this around at will without ever touching the mouse. If you patch to V5 and the realise that in fact you need 4, or 1, or 8, you just deselect all tracks and then keystroke the target track you'd like your source track patched to. So in the example, I've just patched to V5, and then I change my mind, so I deselect all tracks, and then hit 1, the source V1 track then immediately jumps to down to program V1 or I do the same again and hit 8 and source V1 jumps to target V8. It will patch whatever you want wherever you want so long as you are transitioning from a state of no tracks being activated, to a given track being activated, so you just deselect all tracks, and activate 1 to cause auto patching behaviour. You can also activate more than 1 in sequence and it auto patches for you as well.

    It also goes hand in hand with another feature I'd like to see basically copied which is keyboard mapping for track activation/deactivation not be restricted to record tracks:
    https://adobe-video.uservoice.com/forums/911233-premiere-pro/suggestions/41779888-change-toggle-target-audio-video-track-x-key-com.
    However, I don't want separate buttons for source and target though. Instead, you'd have a single set of mappable key command slots for track activation/deactivation and their effect would be contextual depending upon the window focus state. Program or timeline windows for target track activation/deactivation, and source monitor focus for source track activation/deactivation.

    When you combine these 3 elements: a source/program track activation toggle state based upon window focus, a deselect all tracks command and auto-patching, track patching is a breeze.

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  8. 10 votes

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    5 comments  ·  Premiere Pro » Preference & Settings  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    James Clark commented  · 

    What would really help would be the ability to drag interface icons to keys on the virtual keyboard in the keyboard customisation menu. That way, rather than needing to cater to every conceivable operation that might need a keyboard shortcut and inevitably excluding a few that some people like all of us, find essential and which others might never touch; we can just drag this button from the timeline over a key on the virtual keyboard and immediately have key command for it.

  9. 68 votes

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    16 comments  ·  Premiere Pro » Editing  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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  10. 57 votes

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  11. 85 votes

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    17 comments  ·  Premiere Pro » Editing  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    James Clark commented  · 

    I'd vote paste to same track, but actually I think the bigger issue here is that the best choice is always whatever the editor decides, but the current means of choosing which track to paste to is cumbersome which is why this issue even needs to be discussed. Track activation determines where the clip pastes to, but in order to specify which track, one needs to jump through a few hoops except in ideal circumstances where no tracks are currently activated.

    If there was a deselect all tracks command. https://adobe-video.uservoice.com/forums/911233-premiere-pro/suggestions/35351707-deselect-all-tracks-shortcut
    Then you could pick which track to paste 2 in as little as 2 steps. First, deactivate all tracks, then press a key for which track you'd like pasted to.

    That said though, it'd be nice if, when multiple tracks are activated, or when no tracks are activated, the default behaviour were paste to the existing track. It's the least ambiguous as you typically expect things to go to the same place as previously unless otherwise stated. Like saving a project or exporting a video defaults to the last place you selected for either of those things.

  12. 2 votes

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  13. 5 votes

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    6 comments  ·  Premiere Pro » Editing  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    James Clark commented  · 

    This kind of already exists. You open the sequence you want to work with from the project pane and using a mapped key command, or just right clicking you say 'open in source monitor' then when it's in your source monitor you press a key command that you must map for 'open sequence in timeline'.

    This gets you half way there because you have the timeline pane populated with the source sequence and when you move the playhead around, the image updates in the source monitor, not the program monitor, allowing you to splice the contents of the source sequence in the program with the advantages of the fine control offered by actually seeing the source timeline in the timeline pane. The devil is in the details though because the other half of this equation, switching quickly back to the program timeline so you can actually see what you're patching TO can be quick and easy, or frustrating and difficult depending on how you've specifically set you're project up.

    Premiere has a key mappable function called 'timelines' which will switch focus to the timeline window pane, if the timeline pane already had focus when you pressed the key command, then it will switch which timeline you're looking at, if you had more than one timeline open at once. If you only had one open, nothing happens, but if you had 2 open, then it switches to the other of the two. So in your circumstance if you had only your source timeline open and your program timeline open, then hitting this key command will function identically to Avid's toggle source / record in timeline function that you want.

    What sucks though is that it's a bit fragile. For example, the Avid key command ONLY switches source / record timelines so it's function is not ambiguous, however because the Premiere 'timelines' command is actually a focus switching command that can be doubled up to work like the toggle source / record in timeline function, sometimes you may not have noticed you already had timeline focus and then switch focus to the timeline to make an edit, only to remember it already had focus and Premiere switches to a different timeline. That's annoying, but workable as long as you remember what had focus. But also, and this gets down to how you like to work, Premiere, unlike Avid, can have multiple opened timelines appearing as tabs in the timeline windowpane. This feature is great and I think superior to Avid's rigid single timeline only way of working. But if you take advantage of this, which as a Premiere user, you likely would, then using the switch focus to timeline command as a means of switching WHICH timeline to look at gets very problematic because there's more than 2 potential timelines to open. Which one Premiere switches to is based upon the order in which you opened them so you end up getting very confused and it all goes to hell if you try and combine Avid working practices with Premiere ones in this way.

    I'm not really sure what the solution would be. Multiple open timelines is a killer feature and not something you'd want to lose, but toggle source / record in timeline functionality only works reliably when you can only possibly be working with 2 possible choices source or record. Even if a dedicated button were setup, instead of just using the existing switch focus command, there'd still be the question of WHICH source timeline, and WHICH program timeline did you want to toggle to. They could maybe set up the ability for you to flag which timeline is your 'current' one that you'd like to always consider the Program timeline until such time as you set the flag to a different timeline but by that point things are getting pretty convoluted.

    Anyway, if you stuck with me this long. Best bet if you really miss this feature, is to make sure you only have 2 timelines open at any time, and jump between the two open timelines just like it's Avid by using the key command for 'timelines' to switch focus to timeline and then jump between timelines. Otherwise, if you'd like to still take advantage of the being able to scrub a source timeline in the timeline window with the image updating in the source monitor but also STILL want the ability to open several timelines at once, then it's one of the few occasions where the best solution I can think of is probably just use the mouse and click the correct timeline tab.

  14. 3 votes

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  15. 1 vote

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  16. 11 votes

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  17. 126 votes

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    43 comments  ·  Premiere Pro » Editing  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    James Clark commented  · 

    I didn't know they couldn't do this. That's a shame, I don't come across it very often but it's a great way of doing things.

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  18. 607 votes

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  19. 21 votes

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    1 comment  ·  Premiere Pro » Editing  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    James Clark commented  · 

    I think this is requested in various different forms in different requests. I need it for video as well, as sometimes you're trying to insert bits and pieces of one edit in to another edit and there can be a lot of video and audio tracks. I think the Avid implementation of this would be the easiest as they don't actually require different shortcuts for activating/deactivating on source versus target tracks, you just press the 'toggle source/record' button which would be 'toggle source/program focus' in Premiere and then any track activation/deactivation keys you press will affect either the source or the timeline depending on which you toggled and you can switch between at any time. This approach is really elegant because there's no doubling up of keys that have to be mapped for source/program track activation so only one set of shortcuts to remember. The other thing that's good about that method is that if you have a sequence loaded in the source monitor and you 'toggle source/record timeline' which in Premiere would be 'open sequence in timeline' you populate the timeline panel with the source timeline and can activate or deactivate whatever tracks you like whilst much more clearly seeing what’s on those tracks. The activation/deactivation choices you make in that source timeline will remain chosen when you switch back to viewing the program timeline in the timeline panel. Frustratingly in Premiere you can actually already do all of that except that any track activation/deactivation you do in the source timeline has no effect upon the patching when you go back to viewing the target timeline.

    I sound like an Avid shill, but I choose Premiere over Avid for many reasons, there's just lots of little things that Avid does well that I wish could be replicated. The keyboard controlled track activation on both source and target side is one of them and once you have that and get used to it, it pairs beautifully with another feature that's great in Avid that I wish Premiere had called 'auto-patching' which is fiendishly simply but so helpful.

    Anyway, any time I see this suggested in whatever similar wording or form it pops up I always cast a vote for it.

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  20. 15 votes

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    2 comments  ·  Premiere Pro » Editing  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    James Clark commented  · 

    You can already can do this, entirely with the keyboard, you just need to map some extra commands.

    You can map these to whatever you like but the commands to look for in the keyboard shortcuts screen are:

    Select nearest edit point as roll (I mapped to shift+d)
    Select nearest edit point as ripple out (I mapped to shift+s)
    Select nearest edit point as ripple in (I mapped to shift+a)
    Select nearest edit point as trim out (I mapped to shift+w)
    Select nearest edit point as trim in (I mapped to shift+q)

    You can switch from any of these to any other of these before and after entering trim mode. Typically I choose which one I want before, but you can change your mind in trim mode and use it just like you want to. I especially love having these commands mapped because they're dual use, you can use them in trim mode, but also for quick adjustments you don't even need trim and they'll still work, just without the split screen program monitor.

    They're most useful when you have 'go to previous/next edit point on any track' mapped to the up and down keys and the 'go to previous/next edit point' mapped to the A and S keys. This way you can easily snap the exact edit point you want without needing the mouse and then move edit points around using the above mapped shortcuts or for more precision, enter trim mode and easily switch between these different trim operations using the same shortcuts. It's nice too that there's always a clear visual indicator which one you're using on the timeline at the edit point so you can't get confused. I actually never use the change trim type shortcut any more since I can just go straight to the one I need.

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